aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/tools
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>2018-10-23 13:08:53 +0100
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>2018-10-23 13:08:53 +0100
commit0200fbdd431519d730b5d399a12840ec832b27cc (patch)
tree2b58f9e24b61b00e0550f106c95bfabc3b52cfdd /tools
parentde3fbb2aa802a267dee2213ae7d5a1e19eb4294a (diff)
parent01a14bda11add9dcd4a59200f13834d634559935 (diff)
Merge branch 'locking-core-for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip
Pull locking and misc x86 updates from Ingo Molnar: "Lots of changes in this cycle - in part because locking/core attracted a number of related x86 low level work which was easier to handle in a single tree: - Linux Kernel Memory Consistency Model updates (Alan Stern, Paul E. McKenney, Andrea Parri) - lockdep scalability improvements and micro-optimizations (Waiman Long) - rwsem improvements (Waiman Long) - spinlock micro-optimization (Matthew Wilcox) - qspinlocks: Provide a liveness guarantee (more fairness) on x86. (Peter Zijlstra) - Add support for relative references in jump tables on arm64, x86 and s390 to optimize jump labels (Ard Biesheuvel, Heiko Carstens) - Be a lot less permissive on weird (kernel address) uaccess faults on x86: BUG() when uaccess helpers fault on kernel addresses (Jann Horn) - macrofy x86 asm statements to un-confuse the GCC inliner. (Nadav Amit) - ... and a handful of other smaller changes as well" * 'locking-core-for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip: (57 commits) locking/lockdep: Make global debug_locks* variables read-mostly locking/lockdep: Fix debug_locks off performance problem locking/pvqspinlock: Extend node size when pvqspinlock is configured locking/qspinlock_stat: Count instances of nested lock slowpaths locking/qspinlock, x86: Provide liveness guarantee x86/asm: 'Simplify' GEN_*_RMWcc() macros locking/qspinlock: Rework some comments locking/qspinlock: Re-order code locking/lockdep: Remove duplicated 'lock_class_ops' percpu array x86/defconfig: Enable CONFIG_USB_XHCI_HCD=y futex: Replace spin_is_locked() with lockdep locking/lockdep: Make class->ops a percpu counter and move it under CONFIG_DEBUG_LOCKDEP=y x86/jump-labels: Macrofy inline assembly code to work around GCC inlining bugs x86/cpufeature: Macrofy inline assembly code to work around GCC inlining bugs x86/extable: Macrofy inline assembly code to work around GCC inlining bugs x86/paravirt: Work around GCC inlining bugs when compiling paravirt ops x86/bug: Macrofy the BUG table section handling, to work around GCC inlining bugs x86/alternatives: Macrofy lock prefixes to work around GCC inlining bugs x86/refcount: Work around GCC inlining bug x86/objtool: Use asm macros to work around GCC inlining bugs ...
Diffstat (limited to 'tools')
-rw-r--r--tools/memory-model/Documentation/explanation.txt186
-rw-r--r--tools/memory-model/Documentation/recipes.txt2
-rw-r--r--tools/memory-model/README39
-rw-r--r--tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.cat8
-rw-r--r--tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce.litmus7
-rw-r--r--tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/README104
-rw-r--r--tools/objtool/special.c4
7 files changed, 294 insertions, 56 deletions
diff --git a/tools/memory-model/Documentation/explanation.txt b/tools/memory-model/Documentation/explanation.txt
index 0cbd1ef8f86d..35bff92cc773 100644
--- a/tools/memory-model/Documentation/explanation.txt
+++ b/tools/memory-model/Documentation/explanation.txt
@@ -28,7 +28,8 @@ Explanation of the Linux-Kernel Memory Consistency Model
20. THE HAPPENS-BEFORE RELATION: hb
21. THE PROPAGATES-BEFORE RELATION: pb
22. RCU RELATIONS: rcu-link, gp, rscs, rcu-fence, and rb
- 23. ODDS AND ENDS
+ 23. LOCKING
+ 24. ODDS AND ENDS
@@ -1067,28 +1068,6 @@ allowing out-of-order writes like this to occur. The model avoided
violating the write-write coherence rule by requiring the CPU not to
send the W write to the memory subsystem at all!)
-There is one last example of preserved program order in the LKMM: when
-a load-acquire reads from an earlier store-release. For example:
-
- smp_store_release(&x, 123);
- r1 = smp_load_acquire(&x);
-
-If the smp_load_acquire() ends up obtaining the 123 value that was
-stored by the smp_store_release(), the LKMM says that the load must be
-executed after the store; the store cannot be forwarded to the load.
-This requirement does not arise from the operational model, but it
-yields correct predictions on all architectures supported by the Linux
-kernel, although for differing reasons.
-
-On some architectures, including x86 and ARMv8, it is true that the
-store cannot be forwarded to the load. On others, including PowerPC
-and ARMv7, smp_store_release() generates object code that starts with
-a fence and smp_load_acquire() generates object code that ends with a
-fence. The upshot is that even though the store may be forwarded to
-the load, it is still true that any instruction preceding the store
-will be executed before the load or any following instructions, and
-the store will be executed before any instruction following the load.
-
AND THEN THERE WAS ALPHA
------------------------
@@ -1766,6 +1745,147 @@ before it does, and the critical section in P2 both starts after P1's
grace period does and ends after it does.
+LOCKING
+-------
+
+The LKMM includes locking. In fact, there is special code for locking
+in the formal model, added in order to make tools run faster.
+However, this special code is intended to be more or less equivalent
+to concepts we have already covered. A spinlock_t variable is treated
+the same as an int, and spin_lock(&s) is treated almost the same as:
+
+ while (cmpxchg_acquire(&s, 0, 1) != 0)
+ cpu_relax();
+
+This waits until s is equal to 0 and then atomically sets it to 1,
+and the read part of the cmpxchg operation acts as an acquire fence.
+An alternate way to express the same thing would be:
+
+ r = xchg_acquire(&s, 1);
+
+along with a requirement that at the end, r = 0. Similarly,
+spin_trylock(&s) is treated almost the same as:
+
+ return !cmpxchg_acquire(&s, 0, 1);
+
+which atomically sets s to 1 if it is currently equal to 0 and returns
+true if it succeeds (the read part of the cmpxchg operation acts as an
+acquire fence only if the operation is successful). spin_unlock(&s)
+is treated almost the same as:
+
+ smp_store_release(&s, 0);
+
+The "almost" qualifiers above need some explanation. In the LKMM, the
+store-release in a spin_unlock() and the load-acquire which forms the
+first half of the atomic rmw update in a spin_lock() or a successful
+spin_trylock() -- we can call these things lock-releases and
+lock-acquires -- have two properties beyond those of ordinary releases
+and acquires.
+
+First, when a lock-acquire reads from a lock-release, the LKMM
+requires that every instruction po-before the lock-release must
+execute before any instruction po-after the lock-acquire. This would
+naturally hold if the release and acquire operations were on different
+CPUs, but the LKMM says it holds even when they are on the same CPU.
+For example:
+
+ int x, y;
+ spinlock_t s;
+
+ P0()
+ {
+ int r1, r2;
+
+ spin_lock(&s);
+ r1 = READ_ONCE(x);
+ spin_unlock(&s);
+ spin_lock(&s);
+ r2 = READ_ONCE(y);
+ spin_unlock(&s);
+ }
+
+ P1()
+ {
+ WRITE_ONCE(y, 1);
+ smp_wmb();
+ WRITE_ONCE(x, 1);
+ }
+
+Here the second spin_lock() reads from the first spin_unlock(), and
+therefore the load of x must execute before the load of y. Thus we
+cannot have r1 = 1 and r2 = 0 at the end (this is an instance of the
+MP pattern).
+
+This requirement does not apply to ordinary release and acquire
+fences, only to lock-related operations. For instance, suppose P0()
+in the example had been written as:
+
+ P0()
+ {
+ int r1, r2, r3;
+
+ r1 = READ_ONCE(x);
+ smp_store_release(&s, 1);
+ r3 = smp_load_acquire(&s);
+ r2 = READ_ONCE(y);
+ }
+
+Then the CPU would be allowed to forward the s = 1 value from the
+smp_store_release() to the smp_load_acquire(), executing the
+instructions in the following order:
+
+ r3 = smp_load_acquire(&s); // Obtains r3 = 1
+ r2 = READ_ONCE(y);
+ r1 = READ_ONCE(x);
+ smp_store_release(&s, 1); // Value is forwarded
+
+and thus it could load y before x, obtaining r2 = 0 and r1 = 1.
+
+Second, when a lock-acquire reads from a lock-release, and some other
+stores W and W' occur po-before the lock-release and po-after the
+lock-acquire respectively, the LKMM requires that W must propagate to
+each CPU before W' does. For example, consider:
+
+ int x, y;
+ spinlock_t x;
+
+ P0()
+ {
+ spin_lock(&s);
+ WRITE_ONCE(x, 1);
+ spin_unlock(&s);
+ }
+
+ P1()
+ {
+ int r1;
+
+ spin_lock(&s);
+ r1 = READ_ONCE(x);
+ WRITE_ONCE(y, 1);
+ spin_unlock(&s);
+ }
+
+ P2()
+ {
+ int r2, r3;
+
+ r2 = READ_ONCE(y);
+ smp_rmb();
+ r3 = READ_ONCE(x);
+ }
+
+If r1 = 1 at the end then the spin_lock() in P1 must have read from
+the spin_unlock() in P0. Hence the store to x must propagate to P2
+before the store to y does, so we cannot have r2 = 1 and r3 = 0.
+
+These two special requirements for lock-release and lock-acquire do
+not arise from the operational model. Nevertheless, kernel developers
+have come to expect and rely on them because they do hold on all
+architectures supported by the Linux kernel, albeit for various
+differing reasons.
+
+
ODDS AND ENDS
-------------
@@ -1831,26 +1951,6 @@ they behave as follows:
events and the events preceding them against all po-later
events.
-The LKMM includes locking. In fact, there is special code for locking
-in the formal model, added in order to make tools run faster.
-However, this special code is intended to be exactly equivalent to
-concepts we have already covered. A spinlock_t variable is treated
-the same as an int, and spin_lock(&s) is treated the same as:
-
- while (cmpxchg_acquire(&s, 0, 1) != 0)
- cpu_relax();
-
-which waits until s is equal to 0 and then atomically sets it to 1,
-and where the read part of the atomic update is also an acquire fence.
-An alternate way to express the same thing would be:
-
- r = xchg_acquire(&s, 1);
-
-along with a requirement that at the end, r = 0. spin_unlock(&s) is
-treated the same as:
-
- smp_store_release(&s, 0);
-
Interestingly, RCU and locking each introduce the possibility of
deadlock. When faced with code sequences such as:
diff --git a/tools/memory-model/Documentation/recipes.txt b/tools/memory-model/Documentation/recipes.txt
index af72700cc20a..7fe8d7aa3029 100644
--- a/tools/memory-model/Documentation/recipes.txt
+++ b/tools/memory-model/Documentation/recipes.txt
@@ -311,7 +311,7 @@ The smp_wmb() macro orders prior stores against later stores, and the
smp_rmb() macro orders prior loads against later loads. Therefore, if
the final value of r0 is 1, the final value of r1 must also be 1.
-The the xlog_state_switch_iclogs() function in fs/xfs/xfs_log.c contains
+The xlog_state_switch_iclogs() function in fs/xfs/xfs_log.c contains
the following write-side code fragment:
log->l_curr_block -= log->l_logBBsize;
diff --git a/tools/memory-model/README b/tools/memory-model/README
index ee987ce20aae..acf9077cffaa 100644
--- a/tools/memory-model/README
+++ b/tools/memory-model/README
@@ -171,6 +171,12 @@ The Linux-kernel memory model has the following limitations:
particular, the "THE PROGRAM ORDER RELATION: po AND po-loc"
and "A WARNING" sections).
+ Note that this limitation in turn limits LKMM's ability to
+ accurately model address, control, and data dependencies.
+ For example, if the compiler can deduce the value of some variable
+ carrying a dependency, then the compiler can break that dependency
+ by substituting a constant of that value.
+
2. Multiple access sizes for a single variable are not supported,
and neither are misaligned or partially overlapping accesses.
@@ -190,6 +196,36 @@ The Linux-kernel memory model has the following limitations:
However, a substantial amount of support is provided for these
operations, as shown in the linux-kernel.def file.
+ a. When rcu_assign_pointer() is passed NULL, the Linux
+ kernel provides no ordering, but LKMM models this
+ case as a store release.
+
+ b. The "unless" RMW operations are not currently modeled:
+ atomic_long_add_unless(), atomic_add_unless(),
+ atomic_inc_unless_negative(), and
+ atomic_dec_unless_positive(). These can be emulated
+ in litmus tests, for example, by using atomic_cmpxchg().
+
+ c. The call_rcu() function is not modeled. It can be
+ emulated in litmus tests by adding another process that
+ invokes synchronize_rcu() and the body of the callback
+ function, with (for example) a release-acquire from
+ the site of the emulated call_rcu() to the beginning
+ of the additional process.
+
+ d. The rcu_barrier() function is not modeled. It can be
+ emulated in litmus tests emulating call_rcu() via
+ (for example) a release-acquire from the end of each
+ additional call_rcu() process to the site of the
+ emulated rcu-barrier().
+
+ e. Sleepable RCU (SRCU) is not modeled. It can be
+ emulated, but perhaps not simply.
+
+ f. Reader-writer locking is not modeled. It can be
+ emulated in litmus tests using atomic read-modify-write
+ operations.
+
The "herd7" tool has some additional limitations of its own, apart from
the memory model:
@@ -204,3 +240,6 @@ the memory model:
Some of these limitations may be overcome in the future, but others are
more likely to be addressed by incorporating the Linux-kernel memory model
into other tools.
+
+Finally, please note that LKMM is subject to change as hardware, use cases,
+and compilers evolve.
diff --git a/tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.cat b/tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.cat
index 59b5cbe6b624..882fc33274ac 100644
--- a/tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.cat
+++ b/tools/memory-model/linux-kernel.cat
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ let strong-fence = mb | gp
(* Release Acquire *)
let acq-po = [Acquire] ; po ; [M]
let po-rel = [M] ; po ; [Release]
-let rfi-rel-acq = [Release] ; rfi ; [Acquire]
+let po-unlock-rf-lock-po = po ; [UL] ; rf ; [LKR] ; po
(**********************************)
(* Fundamental coherence ordering *)
@@ -60,13 +60,13 @@ let dep = addr | data
let rwdep = (dep | ctrl) ; [W]
let overwrite = co | fr
let to-w = rwdep | (overwrite & int)
-let to-r = addr | (dep ; rfi) | rfi-rel-acq
+let to-r = addr | (dep ; rfi)
let fence = strong-fence | wmb | po-rel | rmb | acq-po
-let ppo = to-r | to-w | fence
+let ppo = to-r | to-w | fence | (po-unlock-rf-lock-po & int)
(* Propagation: Ordering from release operations and strong fences. *)
let A-cumul(r) = rfe? ; r
-let cumul-fence = A-cumul(strong-fence | po-rel) | wmb
+let cumul-fence = A-cumul(strong-fence | po-rel) | wmb | po-unlock-rf-lock-po
let prop = (overwrite & ext)? ; cumul-fence* ; rfe?
(*
diff --git a/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce.litmus b/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce.litmus
index 0f749e419b34..094d58df7789 100644
--- a/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce.litmus
+++ b/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce.litmus
@@ -1,11 +1,10 @@
C ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce
(*
- * Result: Sometimes
+ * Result: Never
*
- * This test shows that the ordering provided by a lock-protected S
- * litmus test (P0() and P1()) are not visible to external process P2().
- * This is likely to change soon.
+ * This test shows that write-write ordering provided by locks
+ * (in P0() and P1()) is visible to external process P2().
*)
{}
diff --git a/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/README b/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/README
index 4581ec2d3c57..5ee08f129094 100644
--- a/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/README
+++ b/tools/memory-model/litmus-tests/README
@@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
-This directory contains the following litmus tests:
+============
+LITMUS TESTS
+============
CoRR+poonceonce+Once.litmus
Test of read-read coherence, that is, whether or not two
@@ -36,7 +38,7 @@ IRIW+poonceonces+OnceOnce.litmus
ISA2+pooncelock+pooncelock+pombonce.litmus
Tests whether the ordering provided by a lock-protected S
litmus test is visible to an external process whose accesses are
- separated by smp_mb(). This addition of an external process to
+ separated by smp_mb(). This addition of an external process to
S is otherwise known as ISA2.
ISA2+poonceonces.litmus
@@ -151,3 +153,101 @@ Z6.0+pooncerelease+poacquirerelease+fencembonceonce.litmus
A great many more litmus tests are available here:
https://github.com/paulmckrcu/litmus
+
+==================
+LITMUS TEST NAMING
+==================
+
+Litmus tests are usually named based on their contents, which means that
+looking at the name tells you what the litmus test does. The naming
+scheme covers litmus tests having a single cycle that passes through
+each process exactly once, so litmus tests not fitting this description
+are named on an ad-hoc basis.
+
+The structure of a litmus-test name is the litmus-test class, a plus
+sign ("+"), and one string for each process, separated by plus signs.
+The end of the name is ".litmus".
+
+The litmus-test classes may be found in the infamous test6.pdf:
+https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~pes20/ppc-supplemental/test6.pdf
+Each class defines the pattern of accesses and of the variables accessed.
+For example, if the one process writes to a pair of variables, and
+the other process reads from these same variables, the corresponding
+litmus-test class is "MP" (message passing), which may be found on the
+left-hand end of the second row of tests on page one of test6.pdf.
+
+The strings used to identify the actions carried out by each process are
+complex due to a desire to have short(er) names. Thus, there is a tool to
+generate these strings from a given litmus test's actions. For example,
+consider the processes from SB+rfionceonce-poonceonces.litmus:
+
+ P0(int *x, int *y)
+ {
+ int r1;
+ int r2;
+
+ WRITE_ONCE(*x, 1);
+ r1 = READ_ONCE(*x);
+ r2 = READ_ONCE(*y);
+ }
+
+ P1(int *x, int *y)
+ {
+ int r3;
+ int r4;
+
+ WRITE_ONCE(*y, 1);
+ r3 = READ_ONCE(*y);
+ r4 = READ_ONCE(*x);
+ }
+
+The next step is to construct a space-separated list of descriptors,
+interleaving descriptions of the relation between a pair of consecutive
+accesses with descriptions of the second access in the pair.
+
+P0()'s WRITE_ONCE() is read by its first READ_ONCE(), which is a
+reads-from link (rf) and internal to the P0() process. This is
+"rfi", which is an abbreviation for "reads-from internal". Because
+some of the tools string these abbreviations together with space
+characters separating processes, the first character is capitalized,
+resulting in "Rfi".
+
+P0()'s second access is a READ_ONCE(), as opposed to (for example)
+smp_load_acquire(), so next is "Once". Thus far, we have "Rfi Once".
+
+P0()'s third access is also a READ_ONCE(), but to y rather than x.
+This is related to P0()'s second access by program order ("po"),
+to a different variable ("d"), and both accesses are reads ("RR").
+The resulting descriptor is "PodRR". Because P0()'s third access is
+READ_ONCE(), we add another "Once" descriptor.
+
+A from-read ("fre") relation links P0()'s third to P1()'s first
+access, and the resulting descriptor is "Fre". P1()'s first access is
+WRITE_ONCE(), which as before gives the descriptor "Once". The string
+thus far is thus "Rfi Once PodRR Once Fre Once".
+
+The remainder of P1() is similar to P0(), which means we add
+"Rfi Once PodRR Once". Another fre links P1()'s last access to
+P0()'s first access, which is WRITE_ONCE(), so we add "Fre Once".
+The full string is thus:
+
+ Rfi Once PodRR Once Fre Once Rfi Once PodRR Once Fre Once
+
+This string can be given to the "norm7" and "classify7" tools to
+produce the name:
+
+ $ norm7 -bell linux-kernel.bell \
+ Rfi Once PodRR Once Fre Once Rfi Once PodRR Once Fre Once | \
+ sed -e 's/:.*//g'
+ SB+rfionceonce-poonceonces
+
+Adding the ".litmus" suffix: SB+rfionceonce-poonceonces.litmus
+
+The descriptors that describe connections between consecutive accesses
+within the cycle through a given litmus test can be provided by the herd
+tool (Rfi, Po, Fre, and so on) or by the linux-kernel.bell file (Once,
+Release, Acquire, and so on).
+
+To see the full list of descriptors, execute the following command:
+
+ $ diyone7 -bell linux-kernel.bell -show edges
diff --git a/tools/objtool/special.c b/tools/objtool/special.c
index 84f001d52322..50af4e1274b3 100644
--- a/tools/objtool/special.c
+++ b/tools/objtool/special.c
@@ -30,9 +30,9 @@
#define EX_ORIG_OFFSET 0
#define EX_NEW_OFFSET 4
-#define JUMP_ENTRY_SIZE 24
+#define JUMP_ENTRY_SIZE 16
#define JUMP_ORIG_OFFSET 0
-#define JUMP_NEW_OFFSET 8
+#define JUMP_NEW_OFFSET 4
#define ALT_ENTRY_SIZE 13
#define ALT_ORIG_OFFSET 0

Privacy Policy