aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/kernel
AgeCommit message (Collapse)AuthorFilesLines
2006-10-02[PATCH] Kprobes: Make kprobe modules more portableAnanth N Mavinakayanahalli2-1/+26
In an effort to make kprobe modules more portable, here is a patch that: o Introduces the "symbol_name" field to struct kprobe. The symbol->address resolution now happens in the kernel in an architecture agnostic manner. 64-bit powerpc users no longer have to specify the ".symbols" o Introduces the "offset" field to struct kprobe to allow a user to specify an offset into a symbol. o The legacy mechanism of specifying the kprobe.addr is still supported. However, if both the kprobe.addr and kprobe.symbol_name are specified, probe registration fails with an -EINVAL. o The symbol resolution code uses kallsyms_lookup_name(). So CONFIG_KPROBES now depends on CONFIG_KALLSYMS o Apparantly kprobe modules were the only legitimate out-of-tree user of the kallsyms_lookup_name() EXPORT. Now that the symbol resolution happens in-kernel, remove the EXPORT as suggested by Christoph Hellwig o Modify tcp_probe.c that uses the kprobe interface so as to make it work on multiple platforms (in its earlier form, the code wouldn't work, say, on powerpc) Signed-off-by: Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli <ananth@in.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Prasanna S Panchamukhi <prasanna@in.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] usb: fixup usb so it uses struct pidEric W. Biederman1-4/+4
The problem with remembering a user space process by its pid is that it is possible that the process will exit, pid wrap around will occur. Converting to a struct pid avoid that problem, and paves the way for implementing a pid namespace. Also since usb is the only user of kill_proc_info_as_uid rename kill_proc_info_as_uid to kill_pid_info_as_uid and have the new version take a struct pid. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Acked-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@suse.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] Use struct pspace in next_pidmap and find_ge_pidEric W. Biederman1-6/+7
This updates my proc: readdir race fix (take 3) patch to account for the changes made by: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> to introduce struct pspace. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] Define struct pspaceSukadev Bhattiprolu1-22/+31
Define a per-container pid space object. And create one instance of this object, init_pspace, to define the entire pid space. Subsequent patches will provide/use interfaces to create/destroy pid spaces. Its a subset/rework of Eric Biederman's patch http://lkml.org/lkml/2006/2/6/285 . Signed-off-by: Eric Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Signed-off-by: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <haveblue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Cc: Kirill Korotaev <dev@sw.ru> Cc: Andrey Savochkin <saw@sw.ru> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] Move pidmap to pspace.hSukadev Bhattiprolu1-6/+1
Move struct pidmap and PIDMAP_ENTRIES to a new file, include/linux/pspace.h where it will be used in subsequent patches to define pid spaces. Its a subset of Eric Biederman's patch http://lkml.org/lkml/2006/2/6/285 [akpm@osdl.org: cleanups] Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Signed-off-by: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <haveblue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] pids coding style use struct pidmap in next_pidmapEric W. Biederman1-1/+1
Use struct pidmap instead of pidmap_t. This updates my proc: readdir race fix (take 3) patch to account for the changes made by: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> to kill pidmap_t. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Cc: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] pids: coding style: use struct pidmapSukadev Bhattiprolu1-5/+5
Use struct pidmap instead of pidmap_t. Its a subset of Eric Biederman's patch http://lkml.org/lkml/2006/2/6/271. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Signed-off-by: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> Cc: Dave Hansen <haveblue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] file: modify struct fown_struct to use a struct pidEric W. Biederman1-1/+1
File handles can be requested to send sigio and sigurg to processes. By tracking the destination processes using struct pid instead of pid_t we make the interface safe from all potential pid wrap around problems. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] pid: export the symbols needed to use struct pid *Eric W. Biederman1-0/+3
pids aren't something that drivers should care about. However there are a lot of helper layers in the kernel that do care, and are built as modules. Before I can convert them to using struct pid instead of pid_t I need to export the appropriate symbols so they can continue to be built. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] pid: implement signal functions that take a struct pid *Eric W. Biederman1-10/+47
Currently the signal functions all either take a task or a pid_t argument. This patch implements variants that take a struct pid *. After all of the users have been update it is my intention to remove the variants that take a pid_t as using pid_t can be more work (an extra hash table lookup) and difficult to get right in the presence of multiple pid namespaces. There are two kinds of functions introduced in this patch. The are the general use functions kill_pgrp and kill_pid which take a priv argument that is ultimately used to create the appropriate siginfo information, Then there are _kill_pgrp_info, kill_pgrp_info, kill_pid_info the internal implementation helpers that take an explicit siginfo. The distinction is made because filling out an explcit siginfo is tricky, and will be even more tricky when pid namespaces are introduced. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] proc: readdir race fix (take 3)Eric W. Biederman1-0/+36
The problem: An opendir, readdir, closedir sequence can fail to report process ids that are continually in use throughout the sequence of system calls. For this race to trigger the process that proc_pid_readdir stops at must exit before readdir is called again. This can cause ps to fail to report processes, and it is in violation of posix guarantees and normal application expectations with respect to readdir. Currently there is no way to work around this problem in user space short of providing a gargantuan buffer to user space so the directory read all happens in on system call. This patch implements the normal directory semantics for proc, that guarantee that a directory entry that is neither created nor destroyed while reading the directory entry will be returned. For directory that are either created or destroyed during the readdir you may or may not see them. Furthermore you may seek to a directory offset you have previously seen. These are the guarantee that ext[23] provides and that posix requires, and more importantly that user space expects. Plus it is a simple semantic to implement reliable service. It is just a matter of calling readdir a second time if you are wondering if something new has show up. These better semantics are implemented by scanning through the pids in numerical order and by making the file offset a pid plus a fixed offset. The pid scan happens on the pid bitmap, which when you look at it is remarkably efficient for a brute force algorithm. Given that a typical cache line is 64 bytes and thus covers space for 64*8 == 200 pids. There are only 40 cache lines for the entire 32K pid space. A typical system will have 100 pids or more so this is actually fewer cache lines we have to look at to scan a linked list, and the worst case of having to scan the entire pid bitmap is pretty reasonable. If we need something more efficient we can go to a more efficient data structure for indexing the pids, but for now what we have should be sufficient. In addition this takes no additional locks and is actually less code than what we are doing now. Also another very subtle bug in this area has been fixed. It is possible to catch a task in the middle of de_thread where a thread is assuming the thread of it's thread group leader. This patch carefully handles that case so if we hit it we don't fail to return the pid, that is undergoing the de_thread dance. Thanks to KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> for providing the first fix, pointing this out and working on it. [oleg@tv-sign.ru: fix it] Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Acked-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Cc: Jean Delvare <jdelvare@suse.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-02[PATCH] list module taint flags in Oops/panicRandy Dunlap1-3/+34
When listing loaded modules during an oops or panic, also list each module's Tainted flags if non-zero (P: Proprietary or F: Forced load only). If a module is did not taint the kernel, it is just listed like usbcore but if it did taint the kernel, it is listed like wizmodem(PF) Example: [ 3260.121718] Unable to handle kernel NULL pointer dereference at 0000000000000000 RIP: [ 3260.121729] [<ffffffff8804c099>] :dump_test:proc_dump_test+0x99/0xc8 [ 3260.121742] PGD fe8d067 PUD 264a6067 PMD 0 [ 3260.121748] Oops: 0002 [1] SMP [ 3260.121753] CPU 1 [ 3260.121756] Modules linked in: dump_test(P) snd_pcm_oss snd_mixer_oss snd_seq snd_seq_device ide_cd generic ohci1394 snd_hda_intel snd_hda_codec snd_pcm snd_timer snd ieee1394 snd_page_alloc piix ide_core arcmsr aic79xx scsi_transport_spi usblp [ 3260.121785] Pid: 5556, comm: bash Tainted: P 2.6.18-git10 #1 [Alternatively, I can look into listing tainted flags with 'lsmod', but that won't help in oopsen/panics so much.] [akpm@osdl.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@xenotime.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] Support piping into commands in /proc/sys/kernel/core_patternAndi Kleen2-1/+5
Using the infrastructure created in previous patches implement support to pipe core dumps into programs. This is done by overloading the existing core_pattern sysctl with a new syntax: |program When the first character of the pattern is a '|' the kernel will instead threat the rest of the pattern as a command to run. The core dump will be written to the standard input of that program instead of to a file. This is useful for having automatic core dump analysis without filling up disks. The program can do some simple analysis and save only a summary of the core dump. The core dump proces will run with the privileges and in the name space of the process that caused the core dump. I also increased the core pattern size to 128 bytes so that longer command lines fit. Most of the changes comes from allowing core dumps without seeks. They are fairly straight forward though. One small incompatibility is that if someone had a core pattern previously that started with '|' they will get suddenly new behaviour. I think that's unlikely to be a real problem though. Additional background: > Very nice, do you happen to have a program that can accept this kind of > input for crash dumps? I'm guessing that the embedded people will > really want this functionality. I had a cheesy demo/prototype. Basically it wrote the dump to a file again, ran gdb on it to get a backtrace and wrote the summary to a shared directory. Then there was a simple CGI script to generate a "top 10" crashes HTML listing. Unfortunately this still had the disadvantage to needing full disk space for a dump except for deleting it afterwards (in fact it was worse because over the pipe holes didn't work so if you have a holey address map it would require more space). Fortunately gdb seems to be happy to handle /proc/pid/fd/xxx input pipes as cores (at least it worked with zsh's =(cat core) syntax), so it would be likely possible to do it without temporary space with a simple wrapper that calls it in the right way. I ran out of time before doing that though. The demo prototype scripts weren't very good. If there is really interest I can dig them out (they are currently on a laptop disk on the desk with the laptop itself being in service), but I would recommend to rewrite them for any serious application of this and fix the disk space problem. Also to be really useful it should probably find a way to automatically fetch the debuginfos (I cheated and just installed them in advance). If nobody else does it I can probably do the rewrite myself again at some point. My hope at some point was that desktops would support it in their builtin crash reporters, but at least the KDE people I talked too seemed to be happy with their user space only solution. Alan sayeth: I don't believe that piping as such as neccessarily the right model, but the ability to intercept and processes core dumps from user space is asked for by many enterprise users as well. They want to know about, capture, analyse and process core dumps, often centrally and in automated form. [akpm@osdl.org: loff_t != unsigned long] Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@suse.de> Cc: Alan Cox <alan@lxorguk.ukuu.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] Create call_usermodehelper_pipe()Andi Kleen1-1/+54
A new member in the ever growing family of call_usermode* functions is born. The new call_usermodehelper_pipe() function allows to pipe data to the stdin of the called user mode progam and behaves otherwise like the normal call_usermodehelp() (except that it always waits for the child to finish) Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@suse.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] r/o bind mount prepwork: inc_nlink() helperDave Hansen1-4/+4
This is mostly included for parity with dec_nlink(), where we will have some more hooks. This one should stay pretty darn straightforward for now. Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <haveblue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] csa accounting taskstats updateJay Lan1-11/+14
ChangeLog: Feedbacks from Andrew Morton: - define TS_COMM_LEN to 32 - change acct_stimexpd field of task_struct to be of cputime_t, which is to be used to save the tsk->stime of last timer interrupt update. - a new Documentation/accounting/taskstats-struct.txt to describe fields of taskstats struct. Feedback from Balbir Singh: - keep the stime of a task to be zero when both stime and utime are zero as recoreded in task_struct. Misc: - convert accumulated RSS/VM from platform dependent pages-ticks to MBytes-usecs in the kernel Cc: Shailabh Nagar <nagar@watson.ibm.com> Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@in.ibm.com> Cc: Jes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com> Cc: Chris Sturtivant <csturtiv@sgi.com> Cc: Tony Ernst <tee@sgi.com> Cc: Guillaume Thouvenin <guillaume.thouvenin@bull.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] csa: convert CONFIG tag for extended accounting routinesJay Lan5-31/+33
There were a few accounting data/macros that are used in CSA but are #ifdef'ed inside CONFIG_BSD_PROCESS_ACCT. This patch is to change those ifdef's from CONFIG_BSD_PROCESS_ACCT to CONFIG_TASK_XACCT. A few defines are moved from kernel/acct.c and include/linux/acct.h to kernel/tsacct.c and include/linux/tsacct_kern.h. Signed-off-by: Jay Lan <jlan@sgi.com> Cc: Shailabh Nagar <nagar@watson.ibm.com> Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@in.ibm.com> Cc: Jes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com> Cc: Chris Sturtivant <csturtiv@sgi.com> Cc: Tony Ernst <tee@sgi.com> Cc: Guillaume Thouvenin <guillaume.thouvenin@bull.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] csa: Extended system accounting over taskstatsJay Lan2-0/+23
Add extended system accounting handling over taskstats interface. A CONFIG_TASK_XACCT flag is created to enable the extended accounting code. Signed-off-by: Jay Lan <jlan@sgi.com> Cc: Shailabh Nagar <nagar@watson.ibm.com> Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@in.ibm.com> Cc: Jes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com> Cc: Chris Sturtivant <csturtiv@sgi.com> Cc: Tony Ernst <tee@sgi.com> Cc: Guillaume Thouvenin <guillaume.thouvenin@bull.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] csa: basic accounting over taskstatsJay Lan3-1/+77
Add some basic accounting fields to the taskstats struct, add a new kernel/tsacct.c to handle basic accounting data handling upon exit. A handle is added to taskstats.c to invoke the basic accounting data handling. Signed-off-by: Jay Lan <jlan@sgi.com> Cc: Shailabh Nagar <nagar@watson.ibm.com> Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@in.ibm.com> Cc: Jes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com> Cc: Chris Sturtivant <csturtiv@sgi.com> Cc: Tony Ernst <tee@sgi.com> Cc: Guillaume Thouvenin <guillaume.thouvenin@bull.net> Cc: "Michal Piotrowski" <michal.k.k.piotrowski@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] Fix taskstats size calculation (use the new genetlink utility functions)Balbir Singh1-1/+1
The addition of the CSA patch pushed the size of struct taskstats to 256 bytes. This exposed a problem with prepare_reply(), we were not allocating space for the netlink and genetlink header. It worked earlier because alloc_skb() would align the skb to SMP_CACHE_BYTES, which added some additonal bytes. Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@in.ibm.com> Cc: Jamal Hadi <hadi@cyberus.ca> Cc: Shailabh Nagar <nagar@watson.ibm.com> Cc: Thomas Graf <tgraf@suug.ch> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: Jay Lan <jlan@engr.sgi.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] kill wall_jiffiesAtsushi Nemoto1-5/+1
With 2.6.18-rc4-mm2, now wall_jiffies will always be the same as jiffies. So we can kill wall_jiffies completely. This is just a cleanup and logically should not change any real behavior except for one thing: RTC updating code in (old) ppc and xtensa use a condition "jiffies - wall_jiffies == 1". This condition is never met so I suppose it is just a bug. I just remove that condition only instead of kill the whole "if" block. [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: s390 build fix and cleanup] Signed-off-by: Atsushi Nemoto <anemo@mba.ocn.ne.jp> Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@muc.de> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net> Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru> Cc: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ian Molton <spyro@f2s.com> Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp> Cc: Hirokazu Takata <takata.hirokazu@renesas.com> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Kyle McMartin <kyle@mcmartin.ca> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org> Cc: Kazumoto Kojima <kkojima@rr.iij4u.or.jp> Cc: Richard Curnow <rc@rc0.org.uk> Cc: William Lee Irwin III <wli@holomorphy.com> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Cc: Paolo 'Blaisorblade' Giarrusso <blaisorblade@yahoo.it> Cc: Miles Bader <uclinux-v850@lsi.nec.co.jp> Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net> Cc: "Luck, Tony" <tony.luck@intel.com> Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] kernel/time/ntp.c: possible cleanupsAdrian Bunk1-20/+20
This patch contains the following possible cleanups: - make the following needlessly global function static: - ntp_update_frequency() - make the following needlessly global variables static: - time_state - time_offset - time_constant - time_reftime - remove the following read-only global variable: - time_precision Signed-off-by: Adrian Bunk <bunk@stusta.de> Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: convert to the NTP4 reference modelRoman Zippel1-32/+19
This converts the kernel ntp model into a model which matches the nanokernel reference implementations. The previous patches already increased the resolution and precision of the computations, so that this conversion becomes quite simple. <linux@horizon.com> explains: The original NTP kernel interface was defined in units of microseconds. That's what Linux implements. As computers have gotten faster and can now split microseconds easily, a new kernel interface using nanosecond units was defined ("the nanokernel", confusing as that name is to OS hackers), and there's an STA_NANO bit in the adjtimex() status field to tell the application which units it's using. The current ntpd supports both, but Linux loses some possible timing resolution because of quantization effects, and the ntpd hackers would really like to be able to drop the backwards compatibility code. Ulrich Windl has been maintaining a patch set to do the conversion for years, but it's hard to keep in sync. Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: convert time_freq to nsec valueRoman Zippel1-14/+22
This converts time_freq to a scaled nsec value and adds around 6bit of extra resolution. This pushes the time_freq to its 32bit limits so the calculatons have to be done with 64bit. Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: remove time_toleranceRoman Zippel1-5/+4
time_tolerance isn't changed at all in the kernel, so simply remove it, this simplifies the next patch, as it avoids a number of conversions. Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: add time_adjust to tick lengthRoman Zippel2-55/+18
This folds update_ntp_one_tick() into second_overflow() and adds time_adjust to the tick length, this makes time_next_adjust unnecessary. This slightly changes the adjtime() behaviour, instead of applying it to the next tick, it's applied to the next second. Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: prescale time_offsetRoman Zippel1-48/+16
This converts time_offset into a scaled per tick value. This avoids now completely the crude compensation in second_overflow(). Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: add time_freq to tick lengthRoman Zippel1-5/+3
This adds the frequency part to ntp_update_frequency(). Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: add time_adj to tick lengthRoman Zippel1-4/+2
This makes time_adj local to second_overflow() and integrates it into the tick length instead of adding it everytime. Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] ntp: add ntp_update_frequencyRoman Zippel2-13/+48
This introduces ntp_update_frequency() and deinlines ntp_clear() (as it's not performance critical). ntp_update_frequency() calculates the base tick length using tick_usec and adds a base adjustment, in case the frequency doesn't divide evenly by HZ. Signed-off-by: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: john stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] NTP: Move all the NTP related code to ntp.cjohn stultz4-384/+391
Move all the NTP related code to ntp.c [akpm@osdl.org: cleanups, build fix] Signed-off-by: John Stultz <johnstul@us.ibm.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] Directed yield: cpu_relax variants for spinlocks and rw-locksMartin Schwidefsky1-2/+2
On systems running with virtual cpus there is optimization potential in regard to spinlocks and rw-locks. If the virtual cpu that has taken a lock is known to a cpu that wants to acquire the same lock it is beneficial to yield the timeslice of the virtual cpu in favour of the cpu that has the lock (directed yield). With CONFIG_PREEMPT="n" this can be implemented by the architecture without common code changes. Powerpc already does this. With CONFIG_PREEMPT="y" the lock loops are coded with _raw_spin_trylock, _raw_read_trylock and _raw_write_trylock in kernel/spinlock.c. If the lock could not be taken cpu_relax is called. A directed yield is not possible because cpu_relax doesn't know anything about the lock. To be able to yield the lock in favour of the current lock holder variants of cpu_relax for spinlocks and rw-locks are needed. The new _raw_spin_relax, _raw_read_relax and _raw_write_relax primitives differ from cpu_relax insofar that they have an argument: a pointer to the lock structure. Signed-off-by: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Haavard Skinnemoen <hskinnemoen@atmel.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] CodingStyle cleanup for kernel/sys.cCal Peake1-50/+30
Fix up kernel/sys.c to be consistent with CodingStyle and the rest of the file. Signed-off-by: Cal Peake <cp@absolutedigital.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-10-01[PATCH] maximum latency tracking infrastructureArjan van de Ven2-1/+280
Add infrastructure to track "maximum allowable latency" for power saving policies. The reason for adding this infrastructure is that power management in the idle loop needs to make a tradeoff between latency and power savings (deeper power save modes have a longer latency to running code again). The code that today makes this tradeoff just does a rather simple algorithm; however this is not good enough: There are devices and use cases where a lower latency is required than that the higher power saving states provide. An example would be audio playback, but another example is the ipw2100 wireless driver that right now has a very direct and ugly acpi hook to disable some higher power states randomly when it gets certain types of error. The proposed solution is to have an interface where drivers can * announce the maximum latency (in microseconds) that they can deal with * modify this latency * give up their constraint and a function where the code that decides on power saving strategy can query the current global desired maximum. This patch has a user of each side: on the consumer side, ACPI is patched to use this, on the producer side the ipw2100 driver is patched. A generic maximum latency is also registered of 2 timer ticks (more and you lose accurate time tracking after all). While the existing users of the patch are x86 specific, the infrastructure is not. I'd like to ask the arch maintainers of other architectures if the infrastructure is generic enough for their use (assuming the architecture has such a tradeoff as concept at all), and the sound/multimedia driver owners to look at the driver facing API to see if this is something they can use. [akpm@osdl.org: cleanups] Signed-off-by: Arjan van de Ven <arjan@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Acked-by: Jesse Barnes <jesse.barnes@intel.com> Cc: "Brown, Len" <len.brown@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-30[PATCH] BLOCK: Make it possible to disable the block layer [try #6]David Howells1-0/+5
Make it possible to disable the block layer. Not all embedded devices require it, some can make do with just JFFS2, NFS, ramfs, etc - none of which require the block layer to be present. This patch does the following: (*) Introduces CONFIG_BLOCK to disable the block layer, buffering and blockdev support. (*) Adds dependencies on CONFIG_BLOCK to any configuration item that controls an item that uses the block layer. This includes: (*) Block I/O tracing. (*) Disk partition code. (*) All filesystems that are block based, eg: Ext3, ReiserFS, ISOFS. (*) The SCSI layer. As far as I can tell, even SCSI chardevs use the block layer to do scheduling. Some drivers that use SCSI facilities - such as USB storage - end up disabled indirectly from this. (*) Various block-based device drivers, such as IDE and the old CDROM drivers. (*) MTD blockdev handling and FTL. (*) JFFS - which uses set_bdev_super(), something it could avoid doing by taking a leaf out of JFFS2's book. (*) Makes most of the contents of linux/blkdev.h, linux/buffer_head.h and linux/elevator.h contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK being set. sector_div() is, however, still used in places, and so is still available. (*) Also made contingent are the contents of linux/mpage.h, linux/genhd.h and parts of linux/fs.h. (*) Makes a number of files in fs/ contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) Makes mm/bounce.c (bounce buffering) contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) set_page_dirty() doesn't call __set_page_dirty_buffers() if CONFIG_BLOCK is not enabled. (*) fs/no-block.c is created to hold out-of-line stubs and things that are required when CONFIG_BLOCK is not set: (*) Default blockdev file operations (to give error ENODEV on opening). (*) Makes some /proc changes: (*) /proc/devices does not list any blockdevs. (*) /proc/diskstats and /proc/partitions are contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) Makes some compat ioctl handling contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) If CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined, makes sys_quotactl() return -ENODEV if given command other than Q_SYNC or if a special device is specified. (*) In init/do_mounts.c, no reference is made to the blockdev routines if CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined. This does not prohibit NFS roots or JFFS2. (*) The bdflush, ioprio_set and ioprio_get syscalls can now be absent (return error ENOSYS by way of cond_syscall if so). (*) The seclvl_bd_claim() and seclvl_bd_release() security calls do nothing if CONFIG_BLOCK is not set, since they can't then happen. Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
2006-09-30[PATCH] BLOCK: Move extern declarations out of fs/*.c into header files [try #6]David Howells1-0/+2
Create a new header file, fs/internal.h, for common definitions local to the sources in the fs/ directory. Move extern definitions that should be in header files from fs/*.c to fs/internal.h or other main header files where they span directories. Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
2006-09-30[PATCH] BLOCK: Remove duplicate declaration of exit_io_context() [try #6]David Howells1-0/+1
Remove the duplicate declaration of exit_io_context() from linux/sched.h. Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
2006-09-30[PATCH] Define vsyscall cache as blob to make clearer that user space ↵Andi Kleen1-4/+4
shouldn't use it Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@suse.de>
2006-09-30[PATCH] x86: Clean up x86 NMI sysctlsAndi Kleen2-8/+4
Use prototypes in headers Don't define panic_on_unrecovered_nmi for all architectures Cc: dzickus@redhat.com Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@suse.de>
2006-09-29[PATCH] cpuset: fix obscure attach_task vs exiting racePaul Jackson1-1/+6
Fix obscure race condition in kernel/cpuset.c attach_task() code. There is basically zero chance of anyone accidentally being harmed by this race. It requires a special 'micro-stress' load and a special timing loop hacks in the kernel to hit in less than an hour, and even then you'd have to hit it hundreds or thousands of times, followed by some unusual and senseless cpuset configuration requests, including removing the top cpuset, to cause any visibly harm affects. One could, with perhaps a few days or weeks of such effort, get the reference count on the top cpuset below zero, and manage to crash the kernel by asking to remove the top cpuset. I found it by code inspection. The race was introduced when 'the_top_cpuset_hack' was introduced, and one piece of code was not updated. An old check for a possibly null task cpuset pointer needed to be changed to a check for a task marked PF_EXITING. The pointer can't be null anymore, thanks to the_top_cpuset_hack (documented in kernel/cpuset.c). But the task could have gone into PF_EXITING state after it was found in the task_list scan. If a task is PF_EXITING in this code, it is possible that its task->cpuset pointer is pointing to the top cpuset due to the_top_cpuset_hack, rather than because the top_cpuset was that tasks last valid cpuset. In that case, the wrong cpuset reference counter would be decremented. The fix is trivial. Instead of failing the system call if the tasks cpuset pointer is null here, fail it if the task is in PF_EXITING state. The code for 'the_top_cpuset_hack' that changes an exiting tasks cpuset to the top_cpuset is done without locking, so could happen at anytime. But it is done during the exit handling, after the PF_EXITING flag is set. So if we verify that a task is still not PF_EXITING after we copy out its cpuset pointer (into 'oldcs', below), we know that 'oldcs' is not one of these hack references to the top_cpuset. Signed-off-by: Paul Jackson <pj@sgi.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] lockdep core: improve the lock-chain-hashIngo Molnar1-2/+2
With CONFIG_DEBUG_LOCK_ALLOC turned off i was getting sporadic failures in the locking self-test: ------------> | Locking API testsuite: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- | spin |wlock |rlock |mutex | wsem | rsem | -------------------------------------------------------------------------- A-A deadlock: ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | A-B-B-A deadlock: ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | A-B-B-C-C-A deadlock: ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | A-B-C-A-B-C deadlock: ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | A-B-B-C-C-D-D-A deadlock: ok |FAILED| ok | ok | ok | ok | A-B-C-D-B-D-D-A deadlock: ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | ok | A-B-C-D-B-C-D-A deadlock: ok | ok | ok | ok | ok |FAILED| after much debugging it turned out to be caused by accidental chain-hash key collisions. The current hash is: #define iterate_chain_key(key1, key2) \ (((key1) << MAX_LOCKDEP_KEYS_BITS/2) ^ \ ((key1) >> (64-MAX_LOCKDEP_KEYS_BITS/2)) ^ \ (key2)) where MAX_LOCKDEP_KEYS_BITS is 11. This hash is pretty good as it will shift by 5 bits in every iteration, where every new ID 'mixed' into the hash would have up to 11 bits. But because there was a 6 bits overlap between subsequent IDs and their high bits tended to be similar, there was a chance for accidental chain-hash collision for a low number of locks held. the solution is to shift by 11 bits: #define iterate_chain_key(key1, key2) \ (((key1) << MAX_LOCKDEP_KEYS_BITS) ^ \ ((key1) >> (64-MAX_LOCKDEP_KEYS_BITS)) ^ \ (key2)) This keeps the hash perfect up to 5 locks held, but even above that the hash is still good because 11 bits is a relative prime to the total 64 bits, so a complete match will only occur after 64 held locks (which doesnt happen in Linux). Even after 5 locks held, entropy of the 5 IDs mixed into the hash is already good enough so that overlap doesnt generate a colliding hash ID. with this change the false positives went away. Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] audit/accounting: tty lockingAlan Cox2-1/+10
Add tty locking around the audit and accounting code. The whole current->signal-> locking is all deeply strange but it's for someone else to sort out. Add rather than replace the lock for acct.c Signed-off-by: Alan Cox <alan@redhat.com> Acked-by: Arjan van de Ven <arjan@linux.intel.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] stop_machine.c copyrightRusty Russell1-0/+3
I had to look back: this code was extracted from the module.c code in 2005. Signed-off-by: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] /sys/modules: allow full length section namesIan S. Nelson1-6/+20
I've been using systemtap for some debugging and I noticed that it can't probe a lot of modules. Turns out it's kind of silly, the sections section of /sys/module is limited to 32byte filenames and many of the actual sections are a a bit longer than that. [akpm@osdl.org: rewrite to use dymanic allocation] Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] cpuset: hotunplug cpus and mems in all cpusetsPaul Jackson1-17/+70
The cpuset code handling hot unplug of CPUs or Memory Nodes was incorrect - it could remove a CPU or Node from the top cpuset, while leaving it still in some child cpusets. One basic rule of cpusets is that each cpusets cpus and mems are subsets of its parents. The cpuset hot unplug code violated this rule. So the cpuset hotunplug handler must walk down the tree, removing any removed CPU or Node from all cpusets. However, it is not allowed to make a cpusets cpus or mems become empty. They can only transition from empty to non-empty, not back. So if the last CPU or Node would be removed from a cpuset by the above walk, we scan back up the cpuset hierarchy, finding the nearest ancestor that still has something online, and copy its CPU or Memory placement. Signed-off-by: Paul Jackson <pj@sgi.com> Cc: Nathan Lynch <ntl@pobox.com> Cc: Anton Blanchard <anton@samba.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] cpuset: top_cpuset tracks hotplug changes to node_online_mapPaul Jackson1-3/+25
Change the list of memory nodes allowed to tasks in the top (root) nodeset to dynamically track what cpus are online, using a call to a cpuset hook from the memory hotplug code. Make this top cpus file read-only. On systems that have cpusets configured in their kernel, but that aren't actively using cpusets (for some distros, this covers the majority of systems) all tasks end up in the top cpuset. If that system does support memory hotplug, then these tasks cannot make use of memory nodes that are added after system boot, because the memory nodes are not allowed in the top cpuset. This is a surprising regression over earlier kernels that didn't have cpusets enabled. One key motivation for this change is to remain consistent with the behaviour for the top_cpuset's 'cpus', which is also read-only, and which automatically tracks the cpu_online_map. This change also has the minor benefit that it fixes a long standing, little noticed, minor bug in cpusets. The cpuset performance tweak to short circuit the cpuset_zone_allowed() check on systems with just a single cpuset (see 'number_of_cpusets', in linux/cpuset.h) meant that simply changing the 'mems' of the top_cpuset had no affect, even though the change (the write system call) appeared to succeed. With the following change, that write to the 'mems' file fails -EACCES, and the 'mems' file stubbornly refuses to be changed via user space writes. Thus no one should be mislead into thinking they've changed the top_cpusets's 'mems' when in affect they haven't. In order to keep the behaviour of cpusets consistent between systems actively making use of them and systems not using them, this patch changes the behaviour of the 'mems' file in the top (root) cpuset, making it read only, and making it automatically track the value of node_online_map. Thus tasks in the top cpuset will have automatic use of hot plugged memory nodes allowed by their cpuset. [akpm@osdl.org: build fix] [bunk@stusta.de: build fix] Signed-off-by: Paul Jackson <pj@sgi.com> Signed-off-by: Adrian Bunk <bunk@stusta.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] introduce TASK_DEAD stateOleg Nesterov2-5/+5
I am not sure about this patch, I am asking Ingo to take a decision. task_struct->state == EXIT_DEAD is a very special case, to avoid a confusion it makes sense to introduce a new state, TASK_DEAD, while EXIT_DEAD should live only in ->exit_state as documented in sched.h. Note that this state is not visible to user-space, get_task_state() masks off unsuitable states. Signed-off-by: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] kill PF_DEAD flagOleg Nesterov2-12/+10
After the previous change (->flags & PF_DEAD) <=> (->state == EXIT_DEAD), we don't need PF_DEAD any longer. Signed-off-by: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] set EXIT_DEAD state in do_exit(), not in schedule()Oleg Nesterov2-3/+1
schedule() checks PF_DEAD on every context switch and sets ->state = EXIT_DEAD to ensure that the exiting task will be deactivated. Note that this EXIT_DEAD is in fact a "random" value, we can use any bit except normal TASK_XXX values. It is better to set this state in do_exit() along with PF_DEAD flag and remove that check in schedule(). We are safe wrt concurrent try_to_wake_up() (for example ptrace, tkill), it can not change task's ->state: the 'state' argument of try_to_wake_up() can't have EXIT_DEAD bit. And in case when try_to_wake_up() sees a stale value of ->state == TASK_RUNNING it will do nothing. Signed-off-by: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
2006-09-29[PATCH] sys_get_robust_list(): don't take tasklist_lockOleg Nesterov1-3/+3
use rcu locks for find_task_by_pid(). Signed-off-by: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>

Privacy Policy